Playing with Ferrofluid | Peter Brunsgaard | Team First | 10/17/2016

Playing with Ferrofluid | Peter Brunsgaard | Team First | 10/17/2016

 

Ferrofluid demonstration using Neodymium magnets by Peter Brunsgaard

Report: Peter Brunsgaard’s Report

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7 Comments. Leave new

  • Maxfield Scrimgeour
    Nov 11, 2016 12:28

    I like this photo a lot. there is a really interesting set up on this photo, which is a very interesting method for setting up this photo. Nice work with the photo here.

    Reply
  • Michael Waterhouse
    Nov 11, 2016 12:27

    Very cool black and white image. Nice capture of the ferrofluid. No distracting elements. Big difference from the original image. Well done.

    Reply
  • Harrison Lien
    Nov 11, 2016 12:26

    Cool photo, good clean crisp focus. I like the black and white, and the lighting. Nice!

    Reply
  • Joseph Straccia
    Oct 31, 2016 18:56

    Interesting effect of the ferrofluid being drawn to two locations by competing magnets. Good job isolating the fluid in the image from the background. It looks like you had some trouble with the focus. If you used autofocus the focusing system probably picked the closest object, the metal part, and not the fluid. A little adjustments manually can be necessary in cases like this.

    Reply
  • Alexander Thompson
    Oct 31, 2016 15:47

    This is a very cool dynamic twist on the classic ferrofluid spike images. I really like the new route you’ve taken. There is a balance to this image. It feels similar to the “Creation of Adam” painting by Michelangelo on the ceiling of the Sistine Chapel. Nicely done!

    Reply
  • Jason Savath
    Oct 24, 2016 12:48

    I like how in this image, two magnets are used to display the tension in the fluid flow. Both magnets are trying to fight for the ferrofluid

    Reply
  • Daniel Luber
    Oct 24, 2016 12:34

    Really cool phenomenon. Great job capturing this. My only feedback would be to keep all portions of the flow in the same focus plane of your camera. It seems like the top magnet might be a little farther back than the bottom magnet.

    Reply

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